Publication Archive

This archive contains all documents published by cep over the last few years:

cepAdhoc: Incisive comment on current EU policy issues.

cepPolicyBrief: Concise 4-page reviews of EU proposals (Regulations, Directives, Green Papers, White Papers, Communications) – including a brief summary and economic and legal assessments.

cepInput: Impulse to current discussions of EU policies.

cepStudy: Comprehensive examination of EU policy proposals affecting the economy.

 

 

2014

The Commission announces to draw up together with enterprises and other stakeholder a code of conduct in 2012. All enterprises are to commit to comply with CSR approaches on a voluntary basis. In addition, enterprises with more than 1000 employees are to adhere to the internationally recognized ISO 26000 Guidance Standards. In order to establish such self-commitments, the Commission wishes to revise the legal framework, in particular in the field of public procurement and thus put enterprises under pressure.

2014

The Commission wishes to revise the Directive on the recognition of professional qualifications. In the present Green Paper, it presents its concept. The Commission is mainly focusing on the introduction of a European professional card in which the countries of origin certify that all requirements for exercising a certain profession in a host country have been met. The procedure is to be carried out electronically.

2014

The Commission deems early childhood education and care (ECEC) an essential foundation for successful lifelong learning, social integration and personal development. Children with a solid ECEC foundation, later have much better options on the labour market for employability.

2014

To date, the “Unisex Directive“ (2004/113/EC) allowed for sex-differentiated insurance premiums and benefits “where the use of sex is a determining factor in the assessment of risk based on relevant and accurate actuarial and statistical data”. On 1 March 2011, the European Court of Justice held that this was not in line with the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.

2014

The Commission proposes two options for reviewing the Working Time Directive and invites the social partners to express whether and which issues they would wish to negotiate. The Commission intends to revise at least the provisions on on-call time and compensatory rest for on-call time (option 1). These revisions are anyway required by the ECJ’s ruling. The second option provides for a comprehensive revision of the Working Time Directive. The Commission aspires to increase flexibility in working time. Moreover, rules on the “work-life balance”, the “opt-out”, paid annual leave and individual sector-specific issues are to be reviewed.

2014

In its Communication, the Commission proposes measures intended to contribute to more flexible labour markets, job creation, workers’ qualification and the improvement of working conditions.

The Commission’s considerations regarding employment policy are based on an EU headline target adopted under the strategy “Europe 2020” [COM(2010) 2020] whose aim it is to achieve an employment rate of 75% by 2020. In order to reach this target, the Commission is shifting its focus from a merely reactive to an anticipatory policy approach, as is already evident in the Single Market Act [COM(2010) 608] and the Flagship Initiative on the Innovation Union [COM(2010) 546], as well as an “Integrated Industrial Policy for the Globalisation Era“ [COM(2010 614)].

2014

Already in the “Women’s Charter“ of March 2010, the Commission announced to strengthen the gender perspective in all its policies. The current Communication substantiates the Commission’s announcement by describing the key areas for action and which measures it wishes to take. The Commission remains rather vague in its Communication, but has published a working document [SEC(2010) 1079] accompanying the Communication with a catalogue of 130 specific, non-legislative measures.

2014

The Commission proposes to entitle undertakings established in a third country to transfer their managers and specialists to their EU subsidiaries. To this end, a uniform procedure for granting residence and working permits should be established in all Member States. The permit is granted for the duration of the transfer and can be extended by up to three years. It is equally valid for transfers to subsidiaries in other Member states if limited to 12 months. Family member should be entitled to enter the EU along with the employee concerned without any integration measures being required before their entry.

2014

In its Green Paper „Adequate, sustainable and safe European pension systems”, published on 7 July 2010, the Commission addresses all the challenges that pay-as-you-go and funded pension schemes are facing. With regard to the pay-as-you-go – usually public – systems, the Commission sees urgent need for action in order to tackle demographic change. Regarding funded systems, the Commission manly calls for EU-wide, harmonised regulation and supervision. The Commission’s aim is to improve the sustainability and security of pension systems. Furthermore, the Commission is considering whether or not it should define “when” pension is adequate.

2014

According to the Commission, a solid vocational education is key to a smooth entry into the labour market. In addititon, the expected shortage of skilled professionals can be best tackled through a consistent vocational training based on a solid vocational education. Moreover, the cross-border mobility of employees can be improved if the comparability of national educational qualifications is ensured and if skills acquired abroad are equally recognised at home. In its Communication, the Commission clearly stresses the necessity to give “a new impetus” to the Copenhagen process which forms the basis of modernising the system of vocational education in Member States in order to establish future-oriented and sustainable vocational education and training systems.