Publication Archive

This archive contains all documents published by cep over the last few years:

cepAdhoc: Incisive comment on current EU policy issues.

cepPolicyBrief: Concise 4-page reviews of EU proposals (Regulations, Directives, Green Papers, White Papers, Communications) – including a brief summary and economic and legal assessments.

cepInput: Impulse to current discussions of EU policies.

cepStudy: Comprehensive examination of EU policy proposals affecting the economy.

 

 

2014

The Commission wishes to introduce a number of amendments to the Prospectus and Solvency II Directive. The aim is to extend the powers of the EU supervisory authorities (ESMA and EIOPA) to develop technical standards, to substantiate their arbitration powers and to introduce transitional periods for the Solvency II Directive. In addition, the Commission’s power to adopt implementing measures, which are still based on the legal position of the Treaty of Nice, are to be adapted to the Lisbon Treaty.

2014

The Commission submits a Green Paper in order to discuss the future role and scope of an audit in the “general context of financial market regulatory reform”. Governance rules and an improved supervision are to contribute to more competition and increased stability in the financial system.

2014

In Spring 2011, the Commission will be publishing a “European resolution framework”. This framework is to allow credit institutions to fail whilst avoiding costs to taxpayers and without endangering financial stability. 

2014

The Commission is changing the rules regarding derivatives which are concluded and traded directly between counterparties (“over-the-counter“, OTC). It wishes that having OTC deals be cleared by central counterparties (CCPs) seated in the EU. Different regulations for financial service providers on the one hand and undertakings on the other hand, and a distinction between speculative OTC derivatives and those serving to hedge real corporate risks are to help improve the stability of the financial system.

2014

The Commission intends to restrict the maximum repayable amount of EU deposit guarantee schemes to € 100,000 in future. Deposit guarantee schemes are being obliged to mutually grant loans.

In the middle of the financial crisis the Council and the European Parliament decided to increase the minimum coverage level to Euro 50,000 and – by the end of 2010 – up to 100,000. Issues such as the EU-wide harmonisation of the financing of deposit guarantee schemes and the establishment of a European deposit guarantee scheme were postponed to 2010.

The latest plans face substantial opposition. Several national parliaments intend to file a subsidiarity complaint, a procedure newly introduced by the Lisbon Treaty, in order to force the Commission to reassess the Proposal.

2014

Since 2009, the Rating-CR regulates the registration and supervision of credit rating agencies at an EU-wide level. National supervisory authorities are key to this procedure. Now, the Commission wishes to change this: In September 2009, the Commission proposed to establish the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) which is to be responsible for the supervision of credit rating agencies in future.

2014

The amendment of the Prospectus Directive is part of a simplification programme by the Commission to cut administrative burdens. Against this background, the Commission wants to make it easier to issue securities in the EU. Also, it aims at increasing legal certainty and lowering costs.

2014

Since the onset of the financial crisis the EU Financial Market Supervision, which is still very nationally-oriented, is up for discussion. Now, the Commission proposes the establishment of three European supervisory authorities (ESA) which are to ensure an improved prudential supervision of banks, insurances and investment firms.

2014

Since the onset of the financial crisis the EU Financial Market Supervision, which is still very nationally-oriented, is up for discussion. Now, the Commission proposes that the ESRB is to monitor the stability of the entire European financial system. Moreover, three European Supervisory Authorities are to ensure an improved prudential supervision of single financial institutions.