Publication Archive

This archive contains all documents published by cep over the last few years:

cepAdhoc: Incisive comment on current EU policy issues.

cepPolicyBrief: Concise 4-page reviews of EU proposals (Regulations, Directives, Green Papers, White Papers, Communications) – including a brief summary and economic and legal assessments.

cepInput: Impulse to current discussions of EU policies.

cepStudy: Comprehensive examination of EU policy proposals affecting the economy.

 

 

2017

The EU Commission wants to strengthen the internal market for consumer financial services. In its analysis of the Commission’s Communication, cep regards as appropriate the Commission’s reluctance to bring in new rules on territorial restrictions because such restrictions are not per se limitations on the internal market.

2017

The EU Commission’s proposed reform of the EU Energy Agency ACER and the creation of additional organisations aims to improve regulation of cross-border electricity networks and the wholesale electricity market. cep criticises the Commission’s proposals.

2017

In future, the EU Commission is to be able to oblige undertakings to submit information. It thereby wants to ensure better enforcement of EU law and better preparation of legislative measures. This could also allow easier investigation and proof of infringements of internal market rules.

2017

The EU Commission wants to make decision-making in the comitology procedure easier and more transparent. cep believes that the proposed aim, of making Member States take greater responsibility, is appropriate. The Commission does not have the necessary democratic legitimacy and public acceptance to make politically sensitive decisions.

2017

The “governance mechanism” aims to enable coordination of the energy policy measures of the Member States and the EU, and tighten planning and reporting duties. The EU Commission’s proposed Regulation creates clarity and reduces excess red tape. However, its authorisation for the Commission to design a financing platform for renewable energy projects is contrary to EU law.

2017

The EU - Commission wants a Regulation to protect the confidentiality of electronic communications and related end-user data more effectively and at the same time ensure the freedom of movement of such data. In cep’s view, the envisaged coherence with the General Data Protection Regulation has not been achieved. This results in legal uncertainty which weakens the EU as a location for the data economy.

2017

The EU Commission wants to further harmonise the rules on the use of radio spectrum. In cep’s view, the long minimum duration of 25 years for time-limited harmonised radio spectrum licences, envisaged by the Commission, should be abolished because, in the technologically fast moving telecommunications sector, it may result in the inefficient distribution of licences.

2017

The EU Commission wants to strengthen competition on the wholesale electricity markets. Cross-border power flows in the EU will also be increased. In cep's view, banning Member States from intervening in price formation on the wholesale electricity markets increases competition amongst electricity producers.

2017

The EU-Commission wants to revise the universal service rules in order to enable all EU citizens to have a broadband connection at an “affordable price”. In cep’s view, however, an obligation for universal service providers, to offer social tariffs below market prices in order to give low-income citizens a broadband connection, would be in breach of the freedom to conduct a business.

2017

By introducing an electronic services card (E-Card), the EU Commission wants to facilitate the cross-border provision of services. This voluntary electronic proof is intended to reduce red tape for service providers from other EU countries and strengthen the internal market. cep finds this to be questionable and the E-Card to be unlawful under EU law because it is in part disproportionate.

2017

The EU Commission wants to improve the qualifications of professional drivers of lorries and buses and amend the corresponding Directive. In cep’s view, a more precise definition of the vehicles whose drivers are exempt from the Professional Drivers Qualification Directive, will help to create a level playing field.

2017

The EU Commission wants to change the obligations of the social insurance systems to provide benefits for EU citizens residing in other EU countries. Thus rights acquired in various different Member States can be exported. cep welcomes the fact that payment of unemployment benefit for a period of six months means an unemployed person can spend longer looking for work in another EU country.

2017

Global female migration is a topic frequently studied in academic literature however; the topic of female brain drain is one that has long been neglected by academic research.

The aim of this report is to gather all available information on female brain drain in Poland and Germany and its impact on labour markets, gender equality, female migration, and human capital, while noting the gaps in data and policymaking.

2017

The recast of the Electricity Market Directive aims to give consumers a stronger influence on the retail electricity market and generally protect the market against state intervention. In cep’s view, however, it is misguided for electricity suppliers to have to offer tariffs with dynamic electricity prices when there is no corresponding demand.

2017

The EU Commission wants to create a level playing field for providers of conventional and new types of electronic communications services (OTT services) and largely harmonise end-user rights. In cep's view, there is however no justification for the many proposed exceptions for number-independent interpersonal communications services in the area of end-user rights.

2017

The share of renewable energy in overall EU energy consumption is to increase to 27% by 2030. This is set out in the EU Commission’s Proposal for a Directive to promote energy from renewable sources (“renewables”) post-2021. In cep’s view, the Proposal allows Member States too much scope for developing inefficient and anti-competitive renewables support schemes.